Netgear ReadyNAS Duo v2 Review [Updated 2020]

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With the home backup and media server heat up, a box full of drives and a URL to your router is no longer enough.  Netgear'sReadyNAS Duo v2 takes the dual-drive shell of its first-gen predecessor then makes upgrades to chip, applications and more, coming at a manageable backup station which also offers media streaming, remote accessibility with smartphone programs and more. Keep Reading for the full SlashGear review.                                                    

Netgear ReadyNAS Duo v2 Hardware

Netgear's chassis is still sober but sturdy, with a blocky metal casing that's bigger than some rivals thanks to its usage of regular 3.5-inch background hard-drives rather than smaller -- normally more expensive and lower capacity -- 2.5-inch cellular drives.  Up front there's a USB 2.0 port with a dedicated“NetgearReadyNASbackup" button which pulls the content of any removable storage plugged off and into a preset folder, along with a power button, drive and activity lights. 

 

As the Duo name implies, this particular ReadyNAS supports a set of HDDs which are hot-swappable.  Storage can be set up as RAID 0"striped" for speed without any redundancy, or RAID 1"mirrored" for information redundancy but half the capacity.  But, extra capacity can be added using the two USB 3.0 ports on the back of this ReadyNAS, a welcome update over the more typical USB 2.0 connections.

Netgear has upgraded the processor to some 1.6GHz Marvell chip paired with 256MB of RAM. Netgear will offer three variations of this ReadyNAS Duo v2.Cheapest is the empty, barebones shell, designed for those wanting to use their own hard-drives, and priced at $199.  Then you will find 1TB and 2TB versions -- each with one driveway -- at $269 and $299 respectively.

Netgear ReadyNAS Duo Software

Backup isn't really hot, and so a home NAS needs to be simple to use if owners are going to stick with it not just installation but taking advantage of the several value-adds Netgear and many others throw in.

The ReadyNAS Duo v2 receives a double-whammy: Netgear has updated its RAIDiator 5 installation software to reduce complexity, and throws in a 3 year warranty too.  For the first 90 days customers get access to 24/7 customer support to help them set the NAS upward; after that, three years of 24/7 support. 

If this seems too abundant, three decades of hardware replacement alone -- within seven business days of an error being diagnosed.  We did not have to call for assistance, however, and we doubt many reasonably confident house users would want to either.

Once the ReadyNAS boots for the first time, an easy browser-based Netgear ReadyNAS setup wizard walks you through formatting your drives in RAID 0 or 1, and then drops you into a straightforward GUI.  In addition to access to instruction and Netgear's internet service, RAIDiator 5 includes various panes for setting up user accounts and shared folders, monitoring the"health" of the NAS like fever and fan-speed, and assessing which"Add-ons" have already been set up. 

For many, the latter will consist of ReadyNAS Remote, which allows you to use Netgear'siOS and Android programs to log in from your smartphone, browse through folders and download articles, and ReadyNAS Photos II, for hosting your Flickr alternative directly in the NAS.

The company's house user attention extends to the straightforward setup and the reassurance of this helpdesk service, and people looking for more complex performance, such as remote access, may have that too as a result of its iOS and Android apps.

With the home backup and media server heat up, a box full of drives and a URL to your router is no longer enough.  Netgear'sReadyNAS Duo v2 takes the dual-drive shell of its first-gen predecessor then makes upgrades to chip, applications and more, coming at a manageable backup station which also offers media streaming, remote accessibility with smartphone programs and more. Keep Reading for the full SlashGear review.                                                    

Netgear ReadyNAS Duo v2 Hardware

Netgear's chassis is still sober but sturdy, with a blocky metal casing that's bigger than some rivals thanks to its usage of regular 3.5-inch background hard-drives rather than smaller -- normally more expensive and lower capacity -- 2.5-inch cellular drives.  Up front there's a USB 2.0 port with a dedicated“Netgear ReadyNAS backup" button which pulls the content of any removable storage plugged off and into a preset folder, along with a power button, drive and activity lights. 

 

As the Duo name implies, this particular ReadyNAS supports a set of HDDs which are hot-swappable.  Storage can be set up as RAID 0"striped" for speed without any redundancy, or RAID 1"mirrored" for information redundancy but half the capacity.  But, extra capacity can be added using the two USB 3.0 ports on the back of this ReadyNAS, a welcome update over the more typical USB 2.0 connections.

Netgear has upgraded the processor to some 1.6GHz Marvell chip paired with 256MB of RAM. Netgear will offer three variations of this ReadyNAS Duo v2.Cheapest is the empty, barebones shell, designed for those wanting to use their own hard-drives, and priced at $199.  Then you will find 1TB and 2TB versions -- each with one driveway -- at $269 and $299 respectively.

Netgear ReadyNAS Duo Software

Backup isn't really hot, and so a home NAS needs to be simple to use if owners are going to stick with it not just installation but taking advantage of the several value-adds Netgear and many others throw in.

The ReadyNAS Duo v2 receives a double-whammy: Netgear has updated its RAIDiator 5 installation software to reduce complexity, and throws in a 3 year warranty too.  For the first 90 days customers get access to 24/7 customer support to help them set the NAS upward; after that, three years of 24/7 support. 

If this seems too abundant, three decades of hardware replacement alone -- within seven business days of an error being diagnosed.  We did not have to call for assistance, however, and we doubt many reasonably confident house users would want to either.

Once the ReadyNAS boots for the first time, an easy browser-based Netgear ReadyNAS setup wizard walks you through formatting your drives in RAID 0 or 1, and then drops you into a straightforward GUI.  In addition to access to instruction and Netgear's internet service, RAIDiator 5 includes various panes for setting up user accounts and shared folders, monitoring the"health" of the NAS like fever and fan-speed, and assessing which"Add-ons" have already been set up. 

For many, the latter will consist of ReadyNAS Remote, which allows you to use Netgear'siOS and Android programs to log in from your smartphone, browse through folders and download articles, and ReadyNAS Photos II, for hosting your Flickr alternative directly in the NAS.

The company's house user attention extends to the straightforward setup and the reassurance of this helpdesk service, and people looking for more complex performance, such as remote access, may have that too as a result of its iOS and Android apps. 

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